Nuffnang

Memory Suitcases is a thought-provoking series by Israeli artist Yuval Yairi that uses old, worn suitcases as canvases for nostalgic landscapes. Like scenes out of one's memory, the propped up traveling cases feature a range of sepia-toned settings. The series presents the objects as though they are relics of a civilization from yesteryear, each with their own story to tell.

There's something both heartbreaking and sentimental about the images. It appears to tell a number of stories of leaving one lifestyle for another. The suitcases hold within them a picture show of memories from a life-altering journey. Like a number of his other works, Memory Suitcases "mimics the natural process of memory."












Body Art by Johannes Stotter

Fine art body painter Johannes Stötter blends his subjects into their surroundings by skillfully applying paint to their skin. He uses the human form as his canvas to both camouflage into their environments and mimic forms found in nature. The illusionary subjects in Stötter's growing collection of creations range from fruits and vegetables to trees, rocks, and wildlife.

Each piece that the artist completes reflects a unity between man and nature. His latest masterpiece uses five people, carefully composed within the frame, to depict a frog. Each person is positioned so perfectly that it is hard to even recognize the contours of their separate bodies at first. Check out the video, below, to see the five people disassemble from their collaborative effort.














Natural History Posters by Andy Ward

UK-based illustrator Andy Ward created this Natural History poster series as a way for kids—and everyone—to learn about the animals of the world. Leo the Lion was originally developed for a children's book, but the little guy was set aside and sat on a shelf for almost ten years. Eventually, Ward pulled Leo off the shelf and, along with 15 other African mammals, the artist created the first poster of the series—Animals of Africa—which was then followed by Animals of the Arctic Circle and Animals of Amazonia. Finally, Ward blended all of the characters together to produce the Animalfabet in which each drawing represents a single letter of the alphabet.

The educational posters incorporate playfully illustrated animals sitting above both their everyday name and their scientific name. The artist researched, referenced, and then sketched the real life animals in order to create his fun versions of each creature. The antique script font and scientific aspects of the poster designs cater to adults while the playful shapes and colors captivate Ward's younger audience. Together kids and adults can learn a little bit about the animals of particular regions around the world.

With a love for natural history, Ward says, "The animal characters are stylized but in no way do I intend on mocking the animals I've drawn. The series is intended to be a celebration of the variety of life and the myriad of innovative specialties evolved in order for each species to carve a niche for itself in it’s environment."







Binary Prints by Alex Trochut - Two Different Portraits Revealed When Lights are On/Off

Brooklyn and Barcelona-based designer Alex Trochut's Binary Prints series takes a look at the dual lives that some of the most influential and pioneering electronic musicians lead from day to night. Having discovered a way to display two images on one surface, the series presents what the artist refers to as "nocturnal portraits" that "wake up" in the dark. Basically, there's one image that viewers can see in the light and another image emerges on the same page in the dark.

With the aid of musicians like LCD Soundsystem's James Murphy allowing the artist to capture their faces in both a state of normalcy or exhaustion and as captivatingly hypnotic as can be, Trochut was able to present a sense of their dichotomous lifestyles.

The project's statement reads: "Anyone who has been present at those transcendental moments of communion at a show can attest to the experience as an awakening—a nighttime rebirth of mind and body. There is a literal translation of the inverted blinking eye, which shows the artists emerging into their nocturnal personas, bringing them into focus, from a anonymous being to an icon of music and sound. Like the experiential discovery inherent in live music, these portraits create layers for the viewers to feel and pull apart, combining the universal with the personal."








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